BONITA ELY

PUBLICATIONS

Ely, B., (2011) Buffer Zone: Site Specific Art at Sydney Olympic Park. National Sculpture Magazine of China, 2011.

 

Ely, B., (2011) Teaching Sculpture at COFA, Sydney. National Sculpture Magazine of China, July edition, 2011.

 

Ely, B., Three Rivers. Australian Experimental Art Foundation, Adelaide. Catalogue.

 

Ely, B., [2006] The Cleveland Street Projects [2006], Performance Space, Sydney. Catalogue notes.

 

Ely, B., [2006] Between Art and Nature, COFA Magazine, Issue 15.

 

Ely, B., [2003]  Taxing Fine Art Academics, NAVA Newsletter, March – May.

 

Ely, B., [2002] Border Panic, Performance Space with Museum of Contemporary Art. Catalogue notes.

 

Ely, B., (2001), Longevity In Hue, TAASA Review, the Journal of the Asian Arts Society of Australia, Vol. 9, No. 3.

 

Ely, B., (2000), Inside Mawson’s Sleeping Bag: the Poetics of Heroism, Catalogue.

 

Ely, B, (1998), Juggernaut, Catalogue, Sutton Gallery, Object Gallery, Bellas Gallery.

 

Ely, B. (1998), Two Gardens and a Wasteland In LA, TAASA Review: the Journal of the Asian Arts Society of Australia, Vol. 7, No. 2.

 

Ely, B. (1997), The Spatiality of Hindu Temples, Southern India, TAASA Review: the Journal of the Asian Arts Society of Australia, Vol. 6, No. 4, P. 10 - 11.

 

Ely, B. (1997) Artists In The House! Elizabeth Bay House Contemporary Art Installation Program, Historic Houses Trust, New South Wales. P. 12. Catalogue notes.

 

Ely, B., (1994) 25 Years of Performance Art In Australia, Ivan Dougherty Gallery, Sydney. P. 25. Catalogue notes.

 

Ely, B., (1994) Sexism and Art Education. Women’s Show; Conference Papers, 1977. Ed. Moore, C., Dissonance - Feminism and the Arts 1970 - 1990. Artspace, with Allen and Unwin, P. 48.

 

Ely, B. (1981), Murray/Murundi, Adelaide, Experimental Art Foundation.

 

Ely, B.; Havana, A. (1979), A Profile of Australian Women Sculptors, 1860 – 1960, (inc. slide kit), Schools Commission, Women’s Art Register, Melbourne.

 

Conference papers

 

2011, National Institute of Experimental Arts conference (NIEA), Improvisation in the Visual Arts. UNSW.

 

2009 ACUADS conference, Aftermath: Teaching sustainability and the practice of public  art. For the Sustainability, Design, Education and Transformation strand.

 

2001, The Ancient History of Installation Art, Spatial Cultures Conference, University of Newcastle:

 

2001, Inside Mawson’s Sleeping Bag, Australians In Antarctica Conference, National Museum of Australia. National Council for the Centenary of Federation event.

 

2001, Great Ideas: the Influence of Artists’ Organisations on Public Art Policy, Sculpture Out There Conference, Canberra School of Art Gallery, National Institute of the Arts, ANU, Canberra

 

CITATIONS:

 

Susan van Wyk, Bonita Ely, 101 Contemporary Australian Artists, 2012, Ed. Kelly Gellatly, pub. National Gallery of Victoria.

 

Ella Mundie, The Research Degree – Consistency VS Diversity, Real Time, rt110 August/Sept, 2012, p 6.

 

Diana Smith, Putting Dogwoman Back Into History, Time Machine Festival, Serial Space, Sydney, July, 2012. P 15, 46.

 

Pedro de Almmeido, Discoveries Continued, catalogue essay for Excavation, 2012. P 6, 16, 51.

 

Glenn Barkley, Bonita Ely, Artist Profile, Issue 14, 2011. P 62 – 69.

 

Tell Me Tell Me: Australian and Korean Art 1976-2011. Museum of Contemporary Art, 2011. Catalogue

 

Buffer Zone, Sydney Olympic Park Gallery, Sydney. 2011, Catalogue.

 

The River Project, Cambelltown Arts Centre, 2010. Project Officer, Susan Gibb.Catalogue. P 11, 51, 52, 56, 173, 181, 189.

 

In the Balance: Art for a Changing World, Museum of Contemporary Art, Sydney. 2010. Catalogue.

 

Mezzer, Barbara, Eye Witness, 2010, Incubate magazine, COFA, UNSW. Issue 6. P 63, 64.

 

Nicholas Croggan, Bonita Ely’s Art of Ecology, Art and Australia, 48, #1, 2010.

 

Britton, Stephanie, New Work: Imaging Climate Change, Artlink, 2009. Vol. 29, No 4. Pp 58, 63.

 

Stefan Delatovic, Sculpture to Have Powerful Message, Barrier Daily Truth, Broken Hill. 17/12/09. P 3.

 

Heat, catalogue, 2008, RMIT Gallery.

 

Helen Vivian, When You Think About Art: the Ewing and George Paton Galleries 1971 – 2008. Macmillan Publishing, 2008.

 

Who’s Who of Australian Women – Leadership and Beyond, Crown content, 2005.

 

Waterlow, N., 5 x 5, [pub. Ivan Dougherty Gallery, College of Fine Arts, UNSW,  Catalogue notes.

 

Crawford, Ashley, Long live the tent embassy. The Age, July 30, 2005.

“Today, the list of artists showing there [Art Projects] reads like a serious who’s who of contemporary Australian art; Greg Ades, Tony Clark, Brett Colquhoun, John Davis, Bonita Ely, Robert Jacks, Jill Orr, John Nixon, Mike Parr, Imants Tillers, Jenny Watson and more.”

 

McDonald, J., Emotion in Slow Motion, Spectrum, Sydney Morning Herald [SMH], 3-4/9/04

 

Neylor, M. & S., Even by Name, Even by…  Sunraysia Daily, 17/3/04

 

Engberg, Juliana, Breadline: Women and Food. Art Link, Vol. 19, No. 4.

“Linking fundamentally to Rosler’s Budding Gourmet in format, but extrapolating the cooking demonstration format to satirise scenarios of the natural environment as well as the domestic ones, Bonita Ely’s Murray River Punch (1980), performed in Melbourne as a part of the Ewing and George Paton Gallery’s performance and discussion program Women at Work, and in the Adelaide Festival in the public thoroughfare of Rundle Mall, marks a subtle shift in the program of feminist performance.

 

“Dressed as the typical CWA-suited disciple of home economics, the paragon of rationality, Ely proffered her Murray River Punch, a foul and toxic cocktail of phosphates, chemicals and animal waste, for sample tasting to unsuspecting passers-by. Her performance illustrated the extent to which Australian women had already, by the early 1980s, moved out of the kitchen and into the public realm to take on the larger issues of land degradation and environmental collapse, a theme explored by many Australian women artists including Jill Orr. While Rosler, in the mid 1970s, was still firmly entrenched in the kitchen, Ely had, by the beginning of the 1980s, made the escape to the public arena as a spokesperson, using the role of matron as a form of authority, as well as an alternative to the generally forgiving and ample figure of an essentialist mother nature, nature/mother.

 

“Graham’s breadline differs significantly from that of Bonita Ely’s earlier New Zealand performance, Breadline, in which the artist moulded shapes of her body in bread dough, then baked and served it as she washed off in a bath of milk, as a critique on woman as a consumable product of culture.”

 

“So from the semiotics of the kitchen, and the dangerous Murray River punch, through the refined repetitions of domestic rituals and back again to street-level in aesthetically organised shelters and socially active projects we see food emerge as a metaphor and a meal.”

 

“If we have in Bonita Ely’s Murray River Punch the first signs of environmental collapse and toxic shock - the symptom - then Norrie’s most recent object from the installation ERR 1999, an oversized jar of ‘anti-radiation’ jam, is the home-spun, and somewhat hopeful, yet probably hopeless antidote.”

 

Kaufman, Nicola, The George Paton Gallery and the Avant-garde. Catalogue essay for Reunion: the art of sixteen graduates”,  George Paton Gallery. The University of Melbourne’s 150th Anniversary, May, 2003.

 

James, Bruce, Don’t be Afraid to Touch Them, They Won’t Bite, 28/5/03, SMH.

“And while the massed hairpins in Bonita Ely’s Infrastructure 262OBR, 2003, snake beyond our reach in the ceiling, we seek their familiar shapes with our eyes, looking for every characteristic bump and bend. In doing so, we take part in the normally inactive space above the line of sight, extending our experiential realm as well as that of the art object.”

 

Dr Juliet Peers, This was the Future, the McClelland Sculpture Award and Sculpture at RMIT during the Jomantas Years 1961-198. Art Link, VOL 24 NO 1.

 

“Bonita Ely’s welcome inclusion indicated the input of `70s feminism to expanding sculptural possibilities.”

 

Merritt, B., On the Outside Looking In, Daily Herald, Salt Lake City, 30/10/03

 

Wright, L., Outside Inside: Installation Art at the MOA, The Daily Universe, 14/10/03

 

Seymour, N., Museum Draws Varied Exhibits to Campus, The Daily Universe, 7/1/04

 

Quoc Hung, Cultural Fusion, The Saigon Times Daily, 16/9/03

 

Quang Thi, Bon hoa si Uc va mot tieng vang Viet Nam, Than Nien, 19/9/03

 

Chu Minh, “Tieng Vang” tu Viet Nam, Lao Dong, 16/9/03

 

Anh Ngoc, Exhibit Falls for Viet Nam Sound, Viet Nam News, 25/9/03

 

Trinh Cung, Bo tu nghe  thuat duong dai den tu Australia, The Thao & Van Hoa, 23/9/03

 

Hoai Nam, La ky niem nhung chuyen tham Viet Nam, Van Hoa: Nghe Thuat, 18/9.03

 

My Thuat, 4 nghe si Uc, Tuoi Tre, 19/9/03

 

Thomas, D. 2002.Terra.  Catalogue,  Fieldwork: Australian Art  1968 - 2002, the Ian Potter Centre [IPC] , National Gallery of Victoria [NGV], pp.66, 67

Green, C., 2002, Into the 90s: the  decay of postmodernism. Catalogue,  Fieldwork: Australian Art  1968 - 2002, IPC., NGV., pp. 102, 104.

Fieldwork: Australian Art  1968 - 2002, IPC., NGV., p. 152

 

Hill, P., Simple Pleasures and Hue, SMH, 8/11/02

 

“Collectively, the works are tough, subtle, complex and at times camouflaged as in the case of Ely’s intervention into the fabric of the gallery’s window blinds.”

 

Hill, P., Raise the Baa. Metro, SMH, 8-14/11/02,  p.  26.

 

Hill, P., Critic’s Picks, SMH, 1/11/02

 

Duncan, J., Michael, L., Monash University Collection: four decades of collecting, Monash University Museum of Art. 2002.

 

Woodburn, Jena, Bonita Ely: Inside Mawson’s Sleeping Bag. Eyeline, ISSUE #46 SPRING 2001

 

Hill, P., 3 Foot Square, Critic’s Picks, Metro, SMH, 1st November, 2002

 

Surgeon, Graham:  “The Development of Australian Sculpture”, Thames and Hudson, London, United Kingdom

 

Scarlett, Ken:  A Dictionary of Australian Sculptors

 

Germain, Max:  A Dictionary of Australian and New Zealand Artists

 

Burke, Janine: “Site Specific: Bonita Ely’s Landscapes”, Island Magazine 1981

 

Murphy, Bernice: “Perspecta” catalogue, Pub. Art Gallery of New South Wales, Sydney 1981

 

“Art in Australia”, Vol. 18, August 1981, p. 227

 

“Art and Australia”, Volume 19, No. 2, Fine Arts Press, 1981

 

Paroissien, Leon:  “Art Review – 1982”

 

Paroissien, Leon:  “Art Review – 1983”

 

“Island Magazine”, No. 16 (Anzart Supplement) September 1983

 

“Perspecta 83 Catalogue”, update section, AGNSW

 

Brady, Tess, Boult, Jenny: “After the Rage”,   Tutu Press, Adelaide, 1983

 

“Art Link”, Vol. 3., No. 3, July/August, 1983

 

Marsh, Ann,  Kent, Jane: “Live Art”, Pub. Adelaide, 1984

 

Taylor, Paul: “Anything Goes– Art in Australia 1970 - 1980”,  Pub. Art and Text, Melbourne, 1984

 

Catalano, Gary: “The Bandaged Image: A Study of Australian Artist’s Books”, Hale and Ironmonger, 1984, Sydney

 

Bond, Tony: “Perspecta 85 Catalogues”. Pub. Art Gallery of New South Wales

 

Ruinard, E: “Dogwoman Makes History”,  (Catalogue) First Draft, 1986, Sydney

 

“A Certain Place”, Artspace, 1987, Sydney  (Catalogue)

 

Bruce, Adams: “Traversing the Difficult Territory of Aboriginal Art”, Sydney Morning Herald, Jan.,16, 1987

 

Coventry, Virginia: “The Critical Distance”, Hale and Ironmonger, Sydney 1987

 

McIntyre, Arthur: “Australian Contemporary Drawing: Resurgence and Re–Definition”, Boolarong Publications, 1988

 

March, Anne:  “Performance Art in the 1970’s”, Art in Australia, Autumn 1989

 

“In Transit: Australian Sculpture, Video, Performance”, catalogue publication.  Drew Gallery, Canterbury, and Chisenhale Gallery, London, United Kingdom, 1989

 

Losche, Diane: “Osmosis: Irony and Disappearance”, Art Monthly Australia, No. 35, October 1990

 

“Art Dock: Art Contemporain Australien”, (cat.), Noumea, New Caledonia, pub. Department of Cultural Affairs, New Caledonia. 1990

 

Burke, Janine: “Field of Vision, A Decade of Change: Women Artists In the70s”, 1990, pub. Viking Penguin Books, Australia.

 

“Unfamiliar Territory”, catalogue pub. Art Gallery of South Australia, 1992

 

Kirby, Sandy: “Sight Lines: Women’s Art and Feminist Perspectives in Australia”, pub. Craftman House, 1992

 

Marsh, Anne: “Body and Self:  Performance Art in Australia 1969 – 92″, 1993 Oxford University Press

 

Brauer, Faye: “Bonita Ely: The Sleep of Reason Produces Monsters” , Eyeline, No. 21, Autumn, 1993

 

Green, Charles: “Art as Printmaking: The Deterritorialised Print”,  Art Monthly, No. 58,  April, 1993

 

“Fifth Australian Sculpture Triennial”, 1993, (cat.)  Art Gallery of NSW

 

Sullivan, Graeme: “Seeing Australia:  Views of Artists and Art Writers” , Piper Press 1994

 

Green, C., “Peripheral Vision: Contemporary Australian Art, 1970 - 1994″; Craftsman House, 1995

 

Kenyon, T., “Under A Hot Tin Roof: Art, Passion and Politics At The Tin Sheds Art Workshop”; Power Publications, U. of S., 1995

 

Timms, P., “Impressed By Nature”, art., The Herald - Sun, August 23, 1995

 

ONE OFF BOOKS BY THE ARTIST:

 

“Memoirs of a Dogwoman”, 1986 , funded by the Kiffy Rubbo Memorial Arts Award. Binding by Heather Mc Pherson.

Pictorial essay composed of images of dogs in art works from public collections in Berlin, Germany, and photographs of live dogs from the environs of (West) Berlin.  The dog and its relation to human kind is used as a metaphor of the human condition.

 

“Lake Benanee/ Dry Lake”, 1983. Hand made artist’s book. Murray River Series.

A pictorial essay of images of dead river red gums that were “drowned” by the raised water table of the Murray River basin in the N.W. corner of N.S.W. near Euston. Lake Benenee and  Dry Lake are fed from the Murray  River system.

 

“Controlled Atmosphere Inc:  Lake Pedder Environmental Impact Statement”,  1983, Anzart in Hobart, Tas.

 

“Controlled atmosphere Inc: Progressive Dementia of Integrated Resource Assemblage”, i983, Artspace, Sydney, N.S.W.

Both of these books were assembled from material created during performances of the same names and as such serve as documentation of the performances as well as works in their own right.

 

“Hold” 1999. Images drawn in pencil on transluscent draughting paper, each overlaying the next as an exploration of the contra indications and complexities of Australian colonial and post colonial  history. For “We Are Australian” travelling exhibition.

 

“Quarry”, 2000. Charcoal, photocopies, felt tip and lead pencil on draughting paper. Traces, marks, quotes and definitions, severed from their origins, create a palimpsest of detritus, misanthropic meanings  and consequence.  For Histories exhibition

 

Ely, B., 2002, Bluey and Curley Conduct the Children’s Choir. Bound drawings, photocopies  and text. For Border Panic exhibition